Insight into how production is returning in the UK

As reported in our news article last week, the TV and Film industry has identified how production can return to the UK.  As these snippets from recent stories from Broadcast Now can attest, that is just the beginning of the story.

On the 28th of May, ITV Studios managing director of continuing drama John Whiston said that programmes were having to innovate to still produce programmes such as Emmerdale and Coronation Street.  Writers were developing plots that were less densely populated, and directors were having to adopt 1930's Hollywood-style techniques to imply intimacy, "with candles blown out and doors shutting at bedtime to ensure the cast are socially-distancing,” he said. “It may be a more polite world for a while.”  Props were also having to be duplicated, so actors had their own versions rather than passing on items. (Full Story)

The sources of content is also having to change. Back in late March, the BBC announced their Culture in Quarantine fund and an anthology of ancient folk tales, a live-action graphic novel and a musical beatboxing short are among 25 self-isolation shows to receive the go ahead as a consequence.  These pieces will be exhibited in slots across BBC TV, iPlayer, BBC Sounds podcasts, Radio 3 and the BBC arts website. BBC director of arts Jonty Claypole said the first commissioning roster has a “breadth of viewpoint, tone and innovation that offers something for everybody”. (Full Story)

In a similar vein, Channel 4 is to embed social media specialists at the heart of its commissioning process to amplify the online reach of its shows.  Through it's newly developed division 4Studio, is to work closely with commissioners and producers to ensure there is a coherent strategy to support the broadcaster’s shows by reaching new audiences on digital platforms.  These include Facebook, YouTube, Instagram and TikTok. (Full Story)

The landscape of the industry is sure to be very different for some time, as producers continue to adapt.